A study of islamic religion

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A study of islamic religion

A study of islamic religion

Religion, Politics and Society Overwhelming percentages of Muslims in many countries want Islamic law sharia to be the official law of the land, according to a worldwide survey by the Pew Research Center. Moreover, Muslims are not equally comfortable with all aspects of sharia: While most favor using religious law in family and property disputes, fewer support the application of severe punishments — such as whippings or cutting off hands — in criminal cases.

The survey also shows that Muslims differ widely in how they interpret certain aspects of sharia, including A study of islamic religion divorce and family planning are morally acceptable.

The survey involved a total of more than 38, face-to-face interviews in plus languages. Regional Differences Attitudes toward Islamic law vary significantly by region.

The Study of Religion Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures Director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program Read more about Ali S. Asani. And a muslim, literally, is one who is surrendering; more specifically, one who is surrendering to God. Muslims believe both that islam is the quintessence of the spiritual impulse present in the earliest humans and that, as "Islam," it is the name of the religious form revealed by God to Muhammad beginning in the year CE. Those who follow . The study of Islam has been in effect uneasily poised between Orientalism and area studies on the one hand and religious studies on the other. It is important to examine the implications of both area studies and religious studies if the academy is to deal with issues relating to Islam in the global public culture that is being formed today.

But in two regions, far fewer Muslims say Islamic law should be endorsed by their governments: Within regions, support for enshrining sharia as official law is particularly high in some countries with predominantly Muslim populations, such as Afghanistan and Iraq.

Distinct legal and political cultures may help to explain the differing levels of support for sharia. Many of the countries surveyed in Central Asia and Southern and Eastern Europe share a history of separating religion and the state.

By contrast, governments in many of the countries surveyed in South Asia and the Middle East-North Africa region have officially embraced Islam. Sharia Sharia, or Islamic law, offers moral and legal guidance for nearly all aspects of life — from marriage and divorce, to inheritance and contracts, to criminal punishments.

The Islamic jurisprudence that comes out of the human exercise of codifying and interpreting these principles is known as fiqh. Muslim scholars and jurists continue to debate the boundary between sharia and fiqh as well as other aspects of Islamic law. Existing Legal Frameworks Indeed, the survey finds that support for making sharia the law of the land is often higher in countries where the constitution or basic laws already favor Islam over other religions.

By comparison, in countries where Islam is not legally favored, roughly a third or fewer Muslims say sharia should be the law of the land.

Study of Islam Section, AAR

Asked whether religious judges should decide family and property disputes, at least half of Muslims living in countries that have religious family courts answer yes. When comparing Muslim attitudes toward sharia as official law and its specific application in the domestic sphere, three countries are particularly instructive: Lebanon, Tunisia and Turkey.

In Lebanon, Islam is not the favored religion of the state, but the major Muslim sects in the country operate their own courts overseeing family law. The Tunisian Constitution favors Islam over other religions, but religious courts, which once governed family law, were abolished in As part of these changes, traditional sharia courts were eliminated in the s.

Religious Commitment and Support for Sharia The survey finds that religious devotion also shapes attitudes toward sharia. In Russia, for example, Muslims who say they pray several times a day are 37 percentage points more likely to support making sharia official law than Muslims who say they pray less frequently.

Similarly, in Lebanon, the Palestinian territories and Tunisia, Muslims who say they pray several times a day are at least 25 percentage points more supportive of enshrining sharia as official law than are less observant Muslims.

Age, Gender, Education and Support for Sharia Across the countries surveyed, support for making sharia the official law of the land generally varies little by age, gender or education. In the few countries where support for Islamic law varies significantly by age, older Muslims tend to favor enshrining sharia as the law of the land more than younger Muslims do.

In only two countries are men significantly more likely than women to favor enshrining sharia as official law: In most countries, Muslims with a secondary degree or higher i. Muslims Who Favor Making Sharia Official Law When Muslims around the world say they want sharia to be the law of the land, what role do they envision for religious law in their country?

First, many, but by no means all, supporters of sharia believe the law of Islam should apply only to Muslims.The study of Islam has been in effect uneasily poised between Orientalism and area studies on the one hand and religious studies on the other.

It is important to examine the implications of both area studies and religious studies if the academy is to deal with issues relating to Islam in the global public culture that is being formed today.

The Study of Religion Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures Director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program Read more about Ali S. Asani.

Pagination

Islamic Studies is one of ten fields in the Department of Religious Studies, where students and professors researching different religious traditions interact. In addition to Prof. Gerhard Bowering and Assoc.

Prof. Frank Griffel, students also have the benefit of professors in the Near Eastern Studies, History, and Political Science Departments.

Carl Ernst's Website

Islamic Studies engages students in the study of the religious institutions, texts and devotional life of Muslim societies. It encourages the study of Islam within a framework emphasizing the dynamic interaction between a global religious tradition and its multiple .

“The Study of Religion and the Study of Islam” Carl W. Ernst. Department of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Table of Contents

Paper given at Workshop on "Integrating Islamic Studies in Liberal Arts Curricula," University of Washington, Seattle WA, March , And a muslim, literally, is one who is surrendering; more specifically, one who is surrendering to God. Muslims believe both that islam is the quintessence of the spiritual impulse present in the earliest humans and that, as "Islam," it is the name of the religious form revealed by God to Muhammad beginning in the year CE.

Those who follow .

The Future of World Religions: Population Growth Projections, | Pew Research Center